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Six Things Applicable Large Employers (ALEs) Need To Know About Information Reporting and Health Coverage Offers

Applicable Large Employers (ALEs) are generally those employers with 50 or more full-time employees, including full-time equivalent employees in the preceding calendar year. If you are an applicable large employer, did you know the Affordable Care Act requires your company to file data returns that report information with the IRS and with your employees as well? Under the Affordable Care Act, not only are you responsible for jumping through all the hoops of providing coverage for your employees, you also need to be the main source of reporting such information to the Internal Revenue Service.

Applicable Large Employers (ALEs) Under ACA

applicable large employers

Applicable Large Employers (ALEs)

As a full-service employee benefits and insurance agency serving Southern California, Pontrelli, Timour & Associates understand that Obamacare has been driving you crazy as a business owner. Luckily, we are here to help guide ALEs through the obstacle course of providing the right benefits at the right cost, while advising you on resources to ensure your reporting requirements are executed on time. We are here to help ease the frustrations of the ACA, and help you contain costs, while keeping your valued employees happy with their benefit options.

Although many employers are not ALEs, thus not subject to this health care tax provision, the employers that do fall under the ALE definition must take action. If you are an applicable large employer you must use Form 1094-C, Transmittal of Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage Information Returns, and Form 1095-C, Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage. These IRS forms are used to report the information about offers of health coverage and enrollment in health coverage for their employees.

Here are six key points ALE’s need to know about the information returns they must file:

Six Key Points for Applicable Large Employers (ALEs)

  1. Form 1095-C is used to report information about each employee who was a full-time employee of the ALE member for any month of the calendar year.
  2. Form 1094-C must be used to report to the IRS summary information for each employer, and to transmit Forms 1095-C to the IRS.
  3. ALEs file a separate Form 1095-C for each of its full-time employees, and a transmittal on Form 1094-C for all of the returns filed for a given calendar year.
  4. Applicable Large Employers that offer employer-sponsored self-insured coverage use Form 1095-C to report information to the IRS and to employees about individuals who have minimum essential coverage under the employer plan.
  5. The information reported on Form 1094-C and Form 1095-C is used in determining whether an employer owes a payment under the employer shared responsibility provisions.
  6. Forms 1094-C and 1095-C, or a substitute form must be filed regardless of whether the ALE member offers coverage, or the employee enrolls in any coverage offered.

If you are an applicable large employer (ALE) and you have yet to file these forms, you are already sailing in treacherous seas. Luckily, Pontrelli, Timour & Associates can help applicable large employers right the ship of their companies and return to calm waters. The goal of PT Benefits is to make sure that our client companies that are ALE’s avoid unnecessary IRS fines while keeping in compliance. At the same time, we want to help you recruit and keep the best employees by offering you’re the best benefits program options available.

PT Benefits Can Help ALEs

To learn more about how PT Benefits can help applicable large employers, please contact us today by calling 626-795-4138 today.

IRS Resources To Help Employers Stay In Compliance With ACA Health Care Law Tax Provisions

ACA health care law is important when it comes to staying in compliance with IRS tax provisions. As an employee benefits and insurance agency in Pasadena, Pontrelli, Timour & Associates focuses on providing our clients and potential clients with essential information about the latest health care law tax provisions. With the Internal Revenue Service in charge of enforcing the Affordable Care Act, such information helps business owners stay in compliance with ACA health care law and avoid unnecessary pitfalls. Although the IRS enforcesACA health care law compliance, they also provide excellent resources to understand health care law tax provisions.

ACA health care law

ACA Health Care Law Compliance

For example, the IRS provides easy access to recorded webinars from IRS about the Affordable Care Act’s employer provisions and related tax requirements. Such webinars are well-designed essential information for employers. If you are a business owner or a tax manager for a company, these videos can be reviewed anytime to better understand how the health care law may affect your organization. The goal is help a business stay in compliance with ACA health care law.

ACA Health Care Law Tax Provisions

Each of the following ACA videos on the IRS Video Portal provides about 40 minutes of detailed information on the specific tax provision mentioned in the title. For example, two of the most effective videos that are worth the effort and time to watch are as follows:

  1. Employer Shared Responsibility Provision

This video helps a company determine their applicable large employer status, payments, and transition relief for 2015. Applicable large employers (ALEs) face the biggest hurdles.

  1. Employer-Sponsored Health Coverage Information Reporting Requirements for Applicable Large Employers

This video provides access to employer-sponsored health coverage information reporting requirements for ALEs, including who is required to report, what information you are required to report, and how to complete the needed forms.

All of the Internal Revenue Service recorded webinars about ACA updates and healthcare provisions can be found in the IRS Video Portal using the following tabs: Businesses and Non-Profits. After clicking on one of these tabs, a business owner only needs to select “Affordable Care Act” from the list of topics on the left side of the screen. Once selected, a list of recordings about the above provisions and other ACA topics will appear.

Pontrelli, Timour & Associates understands if the webinars can seem long and overwhelming. Even when done well, the healthcare information provided remains complex for the non-professional. As an experienced insurance agency, we understand the importance of improving your group benefits offerings while saving money and staying in compliance. Our customer-centric solutions and client services are the cornerstone of your business.

From years of experience, PT Benefits has learned that a happy employee is a productive employee. To access the help your company needs to ensure ACA health care law compliance and future success, please call 626-795-4138 and talk to one of our trained professionals.

Do You Know How PPACA Affects Employers With 50 Or More Full Time Equivalent Employees?

In a recent update released on the IRS.gov website, the Internal Revenue Service offered Affordable Care Act guidance for large employers with 50 or more full time equivalent employees. Since some of the provisions of ACA apply only to large employers, which are generally those with 50 or more equivalent employees working full-time, the goal of this guidance is to let large employers know about deadlines approaching and compliance requirements that need to be met. As a group benefits and insurance leader for companies across Southern California, Pontrelli, Timour & Associates, Inc. offers this synopsis of the main points covered by the IRS in the recent update.

Large Employers Under The Affordable Care Act

50 or more full time equivalent employees

50 or more full time equivalent employees

If you have 50 or more full-time equivalent employees, your company is considered as an applicable large employers or ALEs. Applicable large employers are subject to the employer shared responsibility provisions and the annual employer information return provisions. For example, in 2016 applicable large employers will have annual reporting responsibilities in relation to health insurance. These reporting responsibilities detail whether your company offers health insurance to your employees and what kind of health insurance was offered in 2015 to your full-time employees.

Regardless of size, all employers that provide self-insured health coverage must file an annual return reporting certain information for the employees and other individuals they cover. The first returns are due to be filed in 2016 for the year 2015. Such filings have now become an inherent part of business tax filings with the IRS.

100 Or More Full Time Equivalent Employees

Effective for calendar year 2015, applicable large employers with 100 or more full-time or full-time equivalent employees will be subject to the employer shared responsibility provision. The shared responsibility provision goes hand-in hand with the possibility of having to make a shared responsibility payment. Like a penalty, the shared responsibility payment applies to employers that do not offer adequate, affordable coverage to their full-time employees. As a result of not offering such coverage, if one or more of those employees get a premium tax credit, the shared responsibility payment will be triggered for ALEs with 100 or more full time equivalent employees.

50 Or More Full Time Equivalent Employees

As for the smaller ALEs with 50 or more full time equivalent employees, but less than 100, the employer shared responsibility provisions will be activated from 2015 to 2016. Given this change and potential penalties involved, calculating the number of employees becomes of paramount importance. Any employers that have close to 50 employees or whose workforce fluctuates throughout the year should consult with a benefits administration expert to figure out exactly what they need to stay in compliance.

Although the basic calculation seems simple, it can be particularly complex given the natural fluctuations of a large workforce on an annual basis. The IRS describes the calculation needed:

To determine its workforce size for a year an employer adds its total number of full-time employees for each month of the prior calendar year to the total number of full-time equivalent employees for each calendar month of the prior calendar year and divides that total number by 12.

The Challenge Of 50 Or More Full Time Equivalent Employees

Did you know that employers with more than 50 cannot purchase health insurance coverage for its employees through the Small Business Health Options Program? With the SHOP Marketplace off limits, it becomes even more for employers with 50 more full time equivalent employees to work with a groups benefits provider like Pontrelli, Timour & Associates, Inc. that can answer your questions, lower your costs and help your company stay in compliance. To learn more about how PT Benefits can help, please call us today at 626-795-4138 to speak with a member of our customer-centric team.

PT Benefits Explains Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements Under PPACA: Code Sections 6055 & 6056

PT Benefits wants our clients and potential clients to understand that there are two types of employer shared responsibility payments, also known as pay or play penalties, under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The first penalty under Internal Revenue Code (Code) Section 4980H(a) is the penalty for failure to offer health coverage.  Effective for plan years that began on or after January 1, 2015, a $2,000 annual penalty applies to a large employer that fails to offer at least 70 percent of its full-time employees (FTEs) health coverage. Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements mean serious business.

Penalties & Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements

Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements, PPACA

Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements

The second penalty under §4980H(b) is for the failure to offer coverage that is of minimum value and affordable. The Section 4980H(b) penalty is a $3,000 annual penalty assessed on a monthly basis, and applies to each FTE who is not offered minimum value affordable coverage by the large employer, goes to the Marketplace Exchange and receives an exchange subsidy for insurance he or she purchases through the Marketplace Exchange.  It is important to note that even if an employer offers coverage to 70 percent of its FTEs for 2015 and 95 percent of its FTEs for 2016 and beyond, the employer could still be subject to penalties under Section 4980H(b) if the coverage is unaffordable or does not provide minimum value.

What is even more troubling when it comes to Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements is that even if an employer meets the 70/95 percent threshold, it still faces the potential for the $3,000 Section 4980H(b) penalty for every FTE who is not offered coverage (i.e., the 30/5 percent safe harbor employees) if that employee receives an exchange subsidy for insurance he/she purchases through the Marketplace Exchange.

Code Section 6055 requires health insurance issuers and employers that sponsor self-insured health plans to report information concerning the type and period of coverage to the IRS and to the covered individuals.  Section 6055 reporting is intended to serve as verification that the individual has MEC for purposes of enforcing the ACA’s individual responsibility requirements.  Code Section 6056 requires large employers to provide information to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) about whether MEC is offered to their FTEs and their dependents. The IRS will determine whether an employer owes a shared responsibility payment under Code Section 4980H and whether an employee is eligible for a premium tax credit on a Marketplace Exchange will use this information.

Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements – 6055 & 6056

Employers with 50 or more FTEs use Forms 1094-C and 1095-C to report the information required under Code Sections 6055 and 6056.  Form 1094-C is used to report to the IRS summary information for the employer and to transmit the Forms 1095-C to the IRS.  Form 1095-C is used to report information about each applicable employee. If an employer provides coverage through an insured plan, part of Form 1095-C will be left blank.  The insurance company will separately report on MEC for those individuals enrolled in fully insured plan options.

Recognizing the burden of these Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements imposed on employers, the IRS has provided a simplified reporting method for large employers that make qualifying offers of coverage to FTEs, their spouse and their dependents for all 12 calendar months of the reporting year. A simplified alternative that allows the employer to report without identifying or specifying the number of FTEs is also available for employers that offered, for all 12 months of the calendar year, affordable health coverage under IRS safe harbors.

Help With Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements

PT Benefits believe that employers should review the draft reporting forms and instructions to familiarize themselves with the types of information that must be provided under these Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements.  If such forms and instructions are too complicated, PT Benefits will help our clients navigate this maze of PPACA bureaucracy. To learn more about how PT Benefits can help your company with Employer Shared Responsibility Reporting Requirements and whether your company qualifies for an IRS safe harbor, please call 626-795-4138 today.

100 Plus Employers Need To Be On Alert As IRS Releases Report About Responsibilities Of Employers Under ACA

When the IRS releases a report about the responsibilities of employers under the Affordable Care Act, Pontrelli, Timour & Associates feels the need to raise a red flag.  As a group benefits leader providing Southern California companies with healthcare solutions, PT Benefits wants employers to know that the end of 2014 signals a time to take action. If you are an employer, the number of employees in your business will affect what you need to know about the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

IRS Warns Companies With 100 Plus Employees

affordable care act, aca, 100 plus employers, Obamacare

100 Plus Employers

If you have at 100 full-time and full-time equivalent employees, providing affordable healthcare for your employees is no longer a choice. In the report, the IRS warns that the employer shared responsibility payment will be significant. This payment will happen, even if only one of your employees applies for and receives a subsidy or premium tax credit through a marketplace enrollment.

Moreover, starting in 2016, your company must report to the IRS information about the health care coverage, if any, you offered to your full-time employees for calendar year 2015. You also must furnish related statements to their full-time employees. As a direct result, such reports need to be developed and executed in 2015. As a full-services benefits solutions provider, Pontrelli, Timour & Associates will help advise our clients with resources to comply with these reporting requirements.

100 Plus Employers Employer Shared Responsibility

Although the IRS will not assess employer shared responsibility payments in 2014, this does not mean that you can sit on your hands and ignore the needs of your company. It is true that information reporting related to the employer shared responsibility provisions is voluntary in 2014. After 2014, employer shared responsibility payments will be assessed to companies with 100 plus employees and reporting will be required.

In addition, the employer shared responsibility provisions will be phased in for smaller ALEs from 2015 to 2016.  An ALE is an acronym that stands for Applicable Large Employer, meaning an employer that has 50 or more full time equivalent employees. As a result, although the immediate pressure is on 100 plus companies, 50 plus companies will be squeezed by the IRS as well.

ALEs Of All Sizes Are Ultimately Vulnerable

Specifically, ALEs that meet certain conditions regarding maintenance of workforce size and coverage in 2014 are not subject to the employer shared responsibility provision for 2015.  For 50 plus employers, no employer shared responsibility payment will apply in 2015.  50 plus employers are required to meet the information reporting requirements for 2015.  Despite this breather for 50 plus companies, the IRS wants to make it clear that such employers will be put under the microscope and fined in the future.

The reason Pontrelli, Timour & Associates is waving a red flag and raising the alarm is because too many ALEs and 100 plus employee companies have been avoiding dealing with the Affordable Care Act. What these companies need to realize is that the IRS is in charge of enforcing many of the statutes of the Affordable Care Act. The last thing you want is to place your company under an IRS microscope. If you can avoid dealing with the Internal Revenue Service, this is a good path to take, but you need to take action now.

Pontrelli, Timour & Associates Can Help

For information about and help with the Affordable Care Act and the employer responsibilities outlined by the IRS, please contact Pontrelli, Timour & Associates today. Our goal is to help our clients offer a robust employee benefits program that employees value, while respecting the organization’s budget, and keeping them in compliance.  To learn more about how we can help 100 plus employers and other ALEs, please call Pontrelli, Timour & Associates in Pasadena at 626-795-4138.

How Online Employee Surveys Can Improve Communication And Raise Morale In An Organization

Why should employers use online employee surveys and how can they gauge the temperature of their companies? In the age of the internet and remote work opportunities, the question of employee loyalty to organizations of any size needs to be addressed by employers. Employees are more likely to leave such businesses and move on to other opportunities they now can easily access on the web and through social media sites like LinkedIn.

Online Employee Surveys Can Help

online employee surveys

Online Employee Surveys

To avoid such loss and improve company morale, online surveys can help achieve this goal. Pontrelli, Timour & Associates has learned through experience that online surveys can help reveal a level of employee dissatisfaction that is hidden beneath a surface layer of pleasantries and the desire to not rock the boat. By understanding the true concerns of employees before they become problems and being able to address them in advance, true employee loyalty that supports the long-term interests of a business can be fostered.

3 Benefits Of Utilizing Online Employee Surveys:

1) Surveys Provide Concrete, Actionable Data

On account of their anonymity, surveys provide data that can be used to take concrete actions that foster employee loyalty. If a company is unsure of how employees are relating to new benefits program options, an online survey can provide the information and feelings that employees are not willing to reveal in person. By surveying all of the employees in a business, data can be achieved that reveals the true temperature of a company.

2) Communication Is Streamlined
Online employee surveys provides a level of communication that is much more effective and streamlined than tradition methods of employer-employee interactions. In the past, problems in the office tended to be conveyed via second-hand information and long after the issues should have been addressed. After utilizing surveys, however, problems are revealed first-hand. By speaking their minds a professional and respectful manner, even when the survey is anonymous, employees can help improve office administration and the overall protocols of behavior.

3) The Cost Is Really Low
As opposed to trying to access employee feedback at the end of a performance review, online surveys, both anonymous and otherwise, help generate a much deeper level of honesty. By receiving feedback without the fear of reprisal, once again the true temperature of a business can be properly gauged. In addition, when offered both multiple choice and written methods of response, employees find a comfort zone to communicate what needs to be heard by an employer.

Online Employee Surveys Are Effective

When implemented properly, PT Benefits has seen that online employee surveys can help establish a positive workplace that helps to foster a more productive and profitable business. By boosting morale, long-term employee loyalty becomes a more likely prognosis. In light of healthcare reform and the job security concerns of employees in small to mid-sized businesses, online employee surveys can reveal problems before they arise.

If you would like to learn more about online employee services and how PT Benefits can serve you as experienced insurance brokers, please call at 626-795-4138 for help.

Three Ways For Employers To Help Employees Understand Healthcare Policy In The 21st Century

With the onset of the Affordable Care Act changing the landscape of healthcare benefits and plans, employers need to help employees understand their company’s healthcare policy and the new options provided by the Affordable Care Act. From implementing any of the new changes to communicating new information about both regulations and options to employees, Pontrelli, Timour & Associates can help employers feel comfortable about taking such steps.

healthcare policy

Healthcare Policy in the 21st Century

Once you understand what needs to be communicated, you can come up with a workable and proactive plan of how to communicate this bevy of new information about your healthcare policy.  PT Benefits offers 3 ideas on how to help your employees with a dual goal of covering the informational bases of your new healthcare policy and creating common ground that raises morale.

3 Ways To Help Employees Understand Your Healthcare Policy:

1) An employer should make sure to share the “what” and “why” of their company’s healthcare strategy. If you’re changing your organization’s health benefits approach for 2014, communicate both the “what” and the “why” to employees. Such shifts in strategy and plans are very common among small to mid-sized companies, particularly nonprofits. You should help employees understand what impact the Affordable Care Act has on the plans you offer, including who is eligible for coverage. In addition to raising awareness, all employers are required to provide a notice about new coverage options with the health insurance exchanges.

2) Employers should develop a new plan for distributing resources about basic healthcare information. PT benefits can help you with such a plan based on our experience with other clients. Many employers are shifting how they offer benefits because of the Affordable Care Act. In many cases, this means is a shift toward consumer-driven health care or defined contribution. Both of these models require employees to take more control. Employees need access to resources and education about basic health care terms, and basic healthcare reform information. A good start is by answering the following questions:

Healthcare Policy Questions

  • Who can your employees call with questions?
  • How can healthcare experts like PT Benefits help? 
  • What resources should be provided to employees? 

3) In order to strengthen their bond with employees, employers need to reinforce the value of their health plans and the overall value of working for the company. Regardless of the type of health benefits you are providing, you obviously care about the health of your employees, but do your employees know this to be the case? If not, you should use communication about health reform as an opportunity to reinforce this principle in order to improve retention rates and create a sense of goodwill by raising company morale.

PT Benefits can support your efforts to help your employees understand your company’s healthcare policy. To learn about how we can make the Affordable Care Act easier for your company to navigate, please contact the professionals at Pontrelli, Timour & Associates by calling 626-795-4138 or fill out our handy contact form.

 

 

 

 

Colonial Life Survey Reveals Seven Top Benefits Plan Enrollment Mistakes Made By Employees

benefits plan enrollment mistakes, colonial life survey, employee healthcare

Colonial Life Employee Healthcare Survey

A new Colonial Life survey shows countless employees making benefits plan enrollment mistakes because they lack the willingness to educate themselves. They simply do not know or have a basic understanding of what is available to them. Colonial Life & Accident Insurance Company recently questioned nearly 400 employee benefits counselors about the top mistakes they see employees making during enrollment. As experts in benefits program administration and employee benefit plans, the principals at Pontrelli, Timour & Associates are not surprised by the results of the survey.

The number one mistake was how employees tend to assume they do not need certain benefits being offered without even discussing such options with a benefits professional. This all-too-common mistake was cited by 81 percent of survey respondents.

Benefits Plan Enrollment Mistakes

What PT Benefits find fascinating is how little the expertise of insurance brokers is taken advantage of by employees. It’s almost as if there is a fear that asking questions will have repercussions. From our perspective, there are no foolish questions if they are asked in a honest quest for understanding and knowledge.

Benefits Plan Enrollment Mistakes 2 to 5 were closely grouped in the rankings and all related to lack of information:

  1. Not reading the benefits information prior to enrollment — 69 percent.
  2. Not knowing what benefits they currently have and what they cost — 69  percent
  3. Forgetting to talk with their spouse about their family’s needs before the enrollment — 67 percent
  4. Assuming the cost of a new benefit is unaffordable without seeing any prices — 66 percent

A survey respondent describe his frustration with this lack of planning and foresight by employees when he said: “This is the one time you have to take control of how you want to provide for your family and yourself. Take time to talk with your spouse and understand how the benefits can really help your family.”

Benefits Plan Enrollment Mistakes 6 & 7 directly pertain to a failure to take advantage of educational resources available:

  1. Not attending group informational meetings — 58 percent
  2. Not taking time to understand the upcoming changes in their benefits plan — 50 percent

Personal knowledge can be translated into power, but so few employees seem willing to access such power to help themselves. Many employers give workers the opportunity to meet one-to-one with a benefits expert for a personalized counseling session.

Post-enrollment surveys by Colonial Life show 98 percent of employees who participated in a one-to-one session said it was important, and 97 percent said the session improved their understanding of the benefits being offered.

With the complexities presented by the Affordable Care Act, such past benefits enrollment mistakes are even more dangerous today. PT Benefits recommend that every small to mid-sized employer sit down with their employees and emphasize the importance of education and knowledge.

With ACA affecting everyone and the higher costs coming down the line, it is time for employees to take hold of the reins when it comes to benefits enrollment. If you have questions from the perspective of an employer or an employee about benefits enrollment, please call 866-782-9899 or fill out our handy contact form.

 

Kaiser Family Foundation Study Shows Health Insurance Costs Rising For Both Employers And Employees

A Kaiser Family Foundation study revealed that health insurance costs rose in 2013 for employees in the United States. During the same period, American employers experienced a parallel rise in health insurance premiums. Overall, the total cost of employer-provided health benefits increased 4% for family plans and 5% for individual plans.

Increases In Health Insurance Costs

As a provider of premium benefits programs, Pontrelli, Timour & Associates knows from experience that such increases in health insurance costs usually can be mitigated with effective health insurance solutions. Even with the bevy of new challenges resulting from problems raised by the Affordable Care Act, PT Benefits knows how to provide legitimate savings for both the employers and the employees of our client companies.

health insurance costs, kaiser family foundation

Rising Health Insurance Costs

According to the study by the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation in conjunction with the Health Benefit & Educational Trust., 57% of firms with at least three employees offered health benefits in 2013. The authors of the study noted the figure reveals a slight change from 2012, when 61% of employers offered health benefits. The 61% of 2012 actually was a slight increase from the 60% of employers offering health benefits in 2011.

The average total cost for a family health plan hit $16,351 this year. In most cases, such costs are split between employer and employee. The typical employee’s share of that premium hit $4,565, up about 6% from 2012. In addition to rising employee premiums, the survey revealed that employees are getting hit with larger deductibles and higher out of pocket costs as well. For example, the average deductible for a health plan that covers only the employee reached $1,135, up from $1,097 in 2012.

Employees of small businesses have been hit particularly hard. It historically has been the case that employees of small businesses pay more for their health coverage than employees at larger companies. Nearly a third of workers at companies with fewer than 200 employees have deductibles of at least $2,000. Does it seem fair that an employee should be penalized for choosing to work for a small business as opposed to the alternative?

Health Insurance Costs Higher In 2014?

Looking forward to 2014, and with the implementation of the PPACA’s Minimum Essential Coverage plans, this trend will continue.  Premium rates will somewhat stabilize, but employees will be faced with significantly higher out of pocket costs and out of pocket maximums.  Another significant consideration for next year will be doctor and hospital networks.  Each insurance carrier will have multiple networks and it will be critical to determine which network of providers will work best for you.

Since PT Benefits understands how challenging benefits program administration can be for small to mid-sized business owners, we do our best to provide the best in services and solutions. As benefits administration experts, we offer the guidance our clients need to avoid the pitfalls of high costs and premiums. To learn more about how we can help you, please call 866-782-9899 or fill out our handy contact form.